Justices to tackle campaign finance, affirmative action

4 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Justices to tackle campaign finance, affirmative action Richard Wolf, USA TODAY 4:59 p.m. EDT July 23, 2013 People wait to enter the Supreme Court on June 24, the day the justices ruled on a Texas affirmative action case. (Photo: Mark Wilson Getty Images) Story Highlights High court will hear arguments on individual campaign contributions on the second day of its new term SHARE 22 CONNECT 42 TWEET 4 COMMENTEMAILMORE WASHINGTON The Supreme Court can’t seem to avoid controversy no matter how hard it tries. The court announced its first two weeks of oral arguments for the 2013 term Tuesday, and it includes two familiar topics that divide both Washington and the nation: campaign finance and affirmative action. The term begins Oct.

Banks, finance firms hit by RBI’s rupee defence

More worryingly, nearly three-fourths of Yes Bank’s and Kotak’s borrowings mature in less than a year, according to a Credit Suisse report. Brokers also turned bearish on non-bank financial companies (NBFCs), which traditionally tap short-term debt markets. “Wholesale funded banks (Yes, Indus, Kotak) and NBFCs are going to be worst impacted,” Credit Suisse said. “Apart from the impact on funding cost and margins, growth is now likely to be much lower than the earlier growth trajectory.” Yes Bank Chief Executive and Managing Director Rana Kapoor downplayed his bank’s exposure to the money markets.

G20 finance ministers aim for more growth

(AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko) View Larger From left, Mexico’s Central Bank Governor Agustin Carstens, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, and Special Envoy for the President of the World Bank Mahmoud Mohieldin pose for a group photo after a meeting of the Group of 20 finance ministers in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, July 20, 2013. The finance chiefs of the world’s leading economies hope to force multinational companies to pay more taxes by closing loopholes that have allowed them to stash profits overseas. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko) View Larger Deputy Prime Minister of Japan, Minister of Finance, Taro Aso, right, and Haruhiko Kuroda, Governor of the Bank of Japan speak as they attend a group photo ceremony after a meeting of the Group of 20 finance ministers in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, July 20, 2013. The finance chiefs of the world’s leading economies hope to force multinational companies to pay more taxes by closing loopholes that have allowed them to stash profits overseas.

Responsibility for survivor benefits shifts from Finance to Welfare Ministry

The Holocaust Survivors Rights Authority is responsible for providing monthly payments, medical treatments, rehabilitation and welfare services to Holocaust survivors. Speaking to members of the Knesset State Control Committee during a session attended by representatives of Israels survivor community, Lapid explained that the move was intended to bring together all bodies dealing with Holocaust survivors under one roof. Nothing for survivors will change, Lapid said. The physical locations of offices, phone numbers and fax lines will all stay the same, he added. The Finance Ministry also announced several new benefits that will be granted to survivors, including that they will no longer be required to present receipts for electronic devices to receive a tax refund, and their disability levels will no longer be rounded up to the nearest percentage point, granting them higher benefits.

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